Night wake ups
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Thread: Night wake ups

  1. #1
    amypasetti is offline Member
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    DefaultNight wake ups

    Hi again everyone,

    Everyone on this forum is so helpful, thank you!

    Sadie is starting to sleep a little longer, Hallelujah! She will go from about 2100-0000 or 0100 without having to wake up. BUT...after that it is like she is testing us or trying to find out when she can get up. She barks every hour or two after that. She will always potty but I know that she doesn't have to urgently go because she has proven that she can hold it. We have been taking her out every time she does this.

    This AM, I was so sleepy. I tested this theory. I lay down beside her crate when she started barking at 0400 (my husband had just taken her out at 0300) and she settled right down, went back to bed. Now the floor is NOT sustainable for me, so how do you recommend I go about these awakenings?

    What if she really had to go and we had an accident. I would feel terrible. She is in the habit of an early AM bowel movement at times. Not to mention, THAT would really stink in the middle of the night. Is she training us? I know that you are not supposed to open the crate when they are asking you too or it just reinforces the behavior. I have also read that if it happens in the middle of the night with a small puppy, you should err on the side of taking the dog out.
    I generally keep a schedule during the day so I have a better idea of if she really has to go or not.

    BTW, I NEVER talk to her at night when I take her out, except to say "good potty". It is a straight business trip. She goes right back into the crate. her water is cut off at about 1900 in the evening.

    Thanks,

    Amy

  2. #2
    ZRabbits is offline Senior Member
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    Great to hear! Do the same thing with our pup. Outside early morning, no talking, just good potty. What I have found since really observing my pup is that there are certain types of barks that he will give me. The one that says, he really has to go, is very urgent. I know his "oh I'm up now everyone is up". He's learned that he won't get anywhere with that. I learned this because same thing here, afraid of accidents and definitely would feel terrible.

    I never laid down next to him, but did take him out until I learned his different barks and whines.

    Think you are doing excellent!

    KAZ

  3. #3
    xracer4844 is offline Senior Member
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    you are doing everything correctly! if the barking is the only thing that isn't working, put a blanket over the crate. I'm assuming the pup is next to you in the bedroom?

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  5. #4
    amypasetti is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZRabbits View Post
    Great to hear! Do the same thing with our pup. Outside early morning, no talking, just good potty. What I have found since really observing my pup is that there are certain types of barks that he will give me. The one that says, he really has to go, is very urgent. I know his "oh I'm up now everyone is up". He's learned that he won't get anywhere with that. I learned this because same thing here, afraid of accidents and definitely would feel terrible.

    I never laid down next to him, but did take him out until I learned his different barks and whines.

    Think you are doing excellent!

    KAZ
    KAZ,

    Thanks again for the help! So, would you recommend that I continue taking her out when she barks (even if it is hourly at times) until I learn her different signals (they still all sound the same)? At least I could say that I am meeting her needs if she has to potty.

    What do you think we should do when she barks AGAIN to get attention (usually immediately after taking her out, when she is back in her crate again)? Should we start ignoring those barks and also stop the subsequent lying on the floor? At least we could get over that hump and not feel so stiff in the morning!

    Perhaps in learning that lesson, she will also know that it is time to settle down again--on her own. (she has to know that we are in the room with her at this point--the crate is right beside the bed).

    Eventually, we will know when she has to go and when she is looking to go play...this is what I am hearing?

    Thanks again for helping me to work through this stuff!

    Amy

  6. #5
    amypasetti is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by xracer4844 View Post
    you are doing everything correctly! if the barking is the only thing that isn't working, put a blanket over the crate. I'm assuming the pup is next to you in the bedroom?
    Xracer4844,

    Thank you for the reply and the encouragement. Yes, we do put a blanket over the crate at night and she is right next to us while we sleep.

    Amy

  7. #6
    BirdMan is offline Member
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    Default

    How old is your pup?

  8. #7
    BirdMan is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by amypasetti View Post
    KAZ,

    Thanks again for the help! So, would you recommend that I continue taking her out when she barks (even if it is hourly at times) until I learn her different signals (they still all sound the same)? At least I could say that I am meeting her needs if she has to potty.

    What do you think we should do when she barks AGAIN to get attention (usually immediately after taking her out, when she is back in her crate again)? Should we start ignoring those barks and also stop the subsequent lying on the floor? At least we could get over that hump and not feel so stiff in the morning!

    Perhaps in learning that lesson, she will also know that it is time to settle down again--on her own. (she has to know that we are in the room with her at this point--the crate is right beside the bed).

    Eventually, we will know when she has to go and when she is looking to go play...this is what I am hearing?

    Thanks again for helping me to work through this stuff!

    Amy

    I would absolutely not respond to a barking pup like that. An adult dog that barks and is out of the norm, sure. But your puppy is being rewarded. If you've taken your pup out to potty your puppy can hold it especially for an hour. My puppy, first night home, last potty was 11 PM and wake up was 6 am. We stretched that over the first week and by the weekend he was crated from 10 PM to 7 am without any potty accidents and no night wake ups. Don't give in! You can do it.

  9. #8
    ZRabbits is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by amypasetti View Post
    KAZ,

    Thanks again for the help! So, would you recommend that I continue taking her out when she barks (even if it is hourly at times) until I learn her different signals (they still all sound the same)? At least I could say that I am meeting her needs if she has to potty.

    What do you think we should do when she barks AGAIN to get attention (usually immediately after taking her out, when she is back in her crate again)? Should we start ignoring those barks and also stop the subsequent lying on the floor? At least we could get over that hump and not feel so stiff in the morning!

    Perhaps in learning that lesson, she will also know that it is time to settle down again--on her own. (she has to know that we are in the room with her at this point--the crate is right beside the bed).

    Eventually, we will know when she has to go and when she is looking to go play...this is what I am hearing?

    Thanks again for helping me to work through this stuff!

    Amy
    Ignore the bark for attention. And definitely stop sleeping on the floor. As your pup gets older their bladder control gets better.

    For example, we were ALL up at 3:30 am this morning (husband's doing-bad night). Pup saw us, cried, took him out to potty, then right back into his crate. He could see us sitting in the kitchen and started to cry. Told him hush and ignored and pup didn't get out of crate until breakfast time (5 am). He might give me a whiny cry but he knows he's not getting out so why even bother. Basically watched him plop down with a chew toy and then next thing you know fast asleep.

    My pup, at first, did fight it, but he learned, just like your pup will. Just remember, as she's getting older her bladder control is getting better.

    KAZ

  10. #9
    xracer4844 is offline Senior Member
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    Everyone here is correct. Your pup should get better and better with holding their bladder. At this age- they shouldn't need to get up more than once in the night to go to the bathroom. A general rule to go by is factor in their age. For example a three month old puppy may be okay for for 3 hours without a bathroom break. If you take the dog out - like you are, ignoring them, no expression, no praise, no speaking - back into the crate and if they keep barking, and you know they don't need to go to the bathroom, then you can say "NO BEDTIME" or something to tell the dog, no go back to sleep.

    Get the dog more comfortable with the crate. Make sure you carry the crate out during the day to wherever you are - whether it be watching tv or in the kitchen. Keeping the crate out will teach the dog that the crate isn't just for bed time and being locked up. Leave it open for them to go in and out of. Put your dog's meals in the crate so that they go inside the crate and use it more. They will begin to associate the crate as their own little space. Every time the pup goes into the crate on their own, praise them. Act like it's the best thing in the world.

    Keeping the crate next to you is excellent. It's important for them to know you are there. Nothing is harder on a puppy than being separated from their mother, separated from their litter mates, and isolated in a room on their own. It's important for them to know they are not alone.

    Definitely stop sleeping on the floor. If they keep barking - you may need to be a little bit more harsh with your tone of voice to let them no its not acceptable to be awake and making noise.

  11. #10
    BirdMan is offline Member
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    FWIW, I have never put a crate in my room with me unless I am traveling.

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