results from toe nail surgery
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  1. #1
    lab13 is offline Senior Member
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    Default results from toe nail surgery

    Today, my lab got her bandage off and the results were in from her toe/toe nail surgery. The nail was different on the xray because the toe had a "squamous cell carcinoma" with in it.
    The vet got it all : )!! This is the second toe removal that this dog has had off in 5 years.

    The pathologist report stated the following:

    If this dog is black, then this may be just the first of several that will affect multiple digits on multiple feet over the next few years. I see that it is not the first and it may not be the last.

    It turns out that black dogs ie labs in particular are prone to this. My lab is black!!

    IF your dog ever has a problem with its nail or limps for no injury reason, please take him to the vet.

    Our vet thought it was just a nail issue. We took it off as she was continually lifting up her paw.
    Since she has had the toe off she is much more energetic.

  2. #2
    mattgusmum is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: results from toe nail surgery

    Glad the path results were good. Haven't heard of this before, will have to keep an eye on Gus.........he's black :-\

    Won't someone please feed me!

  3. #3
    Labsrme is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: results from toe nail surgery

    Wow, I've never heard of this before. I hope your dog heals quickly.

  4. #4
    lab13 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: results from toe nail surgery

    Thanks for your thoughts. She isn't doing well at the moment as it is very swollen. She goes back tomorrow and I think they might have to put the bandage on again. She is on medcam and antibiotics.

    Here is a link on her cancer of the toe:



    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Digit (A Cancer of the Toe)

    Understanding Your Pet's Medical Diagnosis

    What is squamous cell carcinoma of the digit (toe)?

    Squamous cell carcinoma is a type of cancer (malignant tumor) that originates from squamous epithelium. Squamous epithelium is formed of flat cells that act as covering plates on the surface of the skin and moist tissues (mucous membranes) of the body. Squamous cell carcinoma of the digit or toe refers to the location of the cancer. Malignant tumors can invade and destroy healthy tissue and can spread to other parts of the body. Squamous cell carcinoma of the toe arises from tissue beneath the toenail. It is the most common tumor of the toe in dogs. Large-breed and black dogs are more likely to develop this cancer than are other breeds; the standard poodle and Labrador retriever are particularly likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma of the toe. Most affected dogs are about 10 years old, but this tumor can develop in dogs as young as 4 years old. It is rare in cats.

    What causes squamous cell carcinoma of the digit?

    The cause is unknown. Black skin is a risk factor, and heredity may play a role.


    What are the signs of squamous cell carcinoma of the digit?

    Swelling of the toe is the usual reason the dog is brought to the veterinarian for examination. Some dogs may have ulcers (loss of surface tissue) on the affected toe. Usually only one toe is involved.


    How is squamous cell carcinoma of the digit diagnosed?

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the digit is diagnosed by physical examination, radiographs (X-rays), and biopsy (removal and examination of tissue). The veterinarian will want to rule out nail-bed infection and other types of cancer. Chest radiographs are important because this tumor can spread to the lungs. Biopsy of the lymph nodes may be recommended to check for spread (metastasis) of the tumor. Radiographs of the affected foot generally reveal destruction to the bone. A biopsy of affected toe tissue is necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

    How is squamous cell carcinoma of the digit treated?

    The treatment of choice is surgical removal of the affected toe; this involves amputation of the toe. The benefits of chemotherapy (anticancer drugs) have not been determined. Animals may benefit from medication to control pain.

    What is the prognosis (outcome) for pets with squamous cell carcinoma of the digit?

    The prognosis for animals with squamous cell carcinoma of the toe depends on the status of the tumor. If the entire tumor can be removed, and no evidence of spreading (metastasis) is seen, the 1- and 2-year survival rates after amputation of the toe are 76% and 43%, respectively, and the tumor probably will not recur. Metastases are uncommon



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